Javier H. Castillo
reclaimingthelatinatag:

The above picture is of my mother. (I posted a selfie during the last time we bombed the Latina tag.) I wanted to write about her because she’s someone whose example I strive to follow.
My mother was born to a middle class family in Mexico City. She is the oldest of six children, and the only member of her immediate family to come to the United States. She left Mexico in January 1981, on a tourist visa, and lived in San Francisco for a while. She could read well in English, but was terrified of speaking it because she had no experience doing so. Despite this, she enrolled in UC Berkeley later that year, at which point she was able to turn her tourist visa into a student visa.
At Berkeley, where she would eventually get a Master’s degree in mathematics, she met my father, a white, Jewish American studying physics. When he completed his doctoral degree, he got a job in New York, and she followed him there in 1984. They got married in 1985, and their first child (me) was born in 1987, followed by my brother in 1990. During this time, my mother also got a Master’s degree in Spanish Literature at Columbia University.
What I admire most about my mother, however, is not her obvious intelligence but her compassion and dedication to helping others. She is very aware that many of her fellow Latinxs do not have the opportunities she did, and she does everything she can to help them. Currently, she works at a local middle and high school, where she helps recently arrived Latinx children. In addition to working with them all week, she offers the more dedicated students hours of free tutoring during the weekends.
She has helped some students for years; I have even gotten to know a lot of them through her, as I sometimes help out when they get stuck on a problem. Recently, one of the students she worked with throughout all of said student’s years in high school got accepted to Cornell University. This is my mother’s dream for all of her students! She loves them all so much and goes above and beyond to help them.
My mother could have a higher paying job with her background, but this is what she does because she feels it is her duty to help those less privileged than herself. I really admire that and hope that I can do the same. She told me, once, that growing up in Mexico City made her acutely aware of how fortunate she was due to the contrast between families like hers and the many people and families making do with practically nothing.
The contrast isn’t as dramatic here. Unfortunately, however, many Latinxs, especially the children who are arriving now, do struggle a lot. My mother does everything she can to help them adjust and succeed academically. It can be an overwhelming and, on occasion, frustrating task, but seeing some of them do well makes it all worthwhile for her. My mother is an amazing woman, and I hope that one day I, too, can have the sort of impact on my students that she has on hers.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

The above picture is of my mother. (I posted a selfie during the last time we bombed the Latina tag.) I wanted to write about her because she’s someone whose example I strive to follow.

My mother was born to a middle class family in Mexico City. She is the oldest of six children, and the only member of her immediate family to come to the United States. She left Mexico in January 1981, on a tourist visa, and lived in San Francisco for a while. She could read well in English, but was terrified of speaking it because she had no experience doing so. Despite this, she enrolled in UC Berkeley later that year, at which point she was able to turn her tourist visa into a student visa.

At Berkeley, where she would eventually get a Master’s degree in mathematics, she met my father, a white, Jewish American studying physics. When he completed his doctoral degree, he got a job in New York, and she followed him there in 1984. They got married in 1985, and their first child (me) was born in 1987, followed by my brother in 1990. During this time, my mother also got a Master’s degree in Spanish Literature at Columbia University.

What I admire most about my mother, however, is not her obvious intelligence but her compassion and dedication to helping others. She is very aware that many of her fellow Latinxs do not have the opportunities she did, and she does everything she can to help them. Currently, she works at a local middle and high school, where she helps recently arrived Latinx children. In addition to working with them all week, she offers the more dedicated students hours of free tutoring during the weekends.

She has helped some students for years; I have even gotten to know a lot of them through her, as I sometimes help out when they get stuck on a problem. Recently, one of the students she worked with throughout all of said student’s years in high school got accepted to Cornell University. This is my mother’s dream for all of her students! She loves them all so much and goes above and beyond to help them.

My mother could have a higher paying job with her background, but this is what she does because she feels it is her duty to help those less privileged than herself. I really admire that and hope that I can do the same. She told me, once, that growing up in Mexico City made her acutely aware of how fortunate she was due to the contrast between families like hers and the many people and families making do with practically nothing.

The contrast isn’t as dramatic here. Unfortunately, however, many Latinxs, especially the children who are arriving now, do struggle a lot. My mother does everything she can to help them adjust and succeed academically. It can be an overwhelming and, on occasion, frustrating task, but seeing some of them do well makes it all worthwhile for her. My mother is an amazing woman, and I hope that one day I, too, can have the sort of impact on my students that she has on hers.

Aug. 27 1:35 pm

justice4mikebrown:

thinksquad:

Beverly Hills police officials said Tuesday that it was “extremely unfortunate” that officers handcuffed and detained an African American film producer who was in the city to attend a pre-Emmy party.
Producer Charles Belk “matched the clothing and physical characteristics” of a suspected bank robber when he was pulled over by officers on Friday evening after he left a restaurant on Wilshire Boulevard, according to the Beverly Hills Police Department.
Belk said on Facebook that he was walking to his car when he was confronted by police, handcuffed and forced to sit on the sidewalk. He said he was detained for six hours.
http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-charles-belk-beverly-hills-police-apologzie-20140826-story.html

thinksquad:

Beverly Hills police officials said Tuesday that it was “extremely unfortunate” that officers handcuffed and detained an African American film producer who was in the city to attend a pre-Emmy party.

Producer Charles Belk “matched the clothing and physical characteristics” of a suspected bank robber when he was pulled over by officers on Friday evening after he left a restaurant on Wilshire Boulevard, according to the Beverly Hills Police Department.

Belk said on Facebook that he was walking to his car when he was confronted by police, handcuffed and forced to sit on the sidewalk. He said he was detained for six hours.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-charles-belk-beverly-hills-police-apologzie-20140826-story.html

breenewsome:

Handcuff suicides are oddly common… #handsup #dontshoot #policebrutality #ourlivesmatter #ferguson #mikebrown #blacklivesmatter

breenewsome:

Handcuff suicides are oddly common… #handsup #dontshoot #policebrutality #ourlivesmatter #ferguson #mikebrown #blacklivesmatter

soundlyawake:

are we really fucking real right now

Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.

The best Supreme Court in anybody’s memory. I’m really proud of this Supreme Court. It’s only five to four, and I pray for the health of the five.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, speaking behind what he thought were closed doors at the Koch brothers’ retreat for the ultra-rich. A GOP Senate, he promised, will slash funds to the ACA, Dodd-Frank and the EPA, and block any minimum wage hike

It’s almost like he’s an employee of the Koch brothers

(via odinsblog)

Can you say “oligarchy?”

supercargautier:

just to be clear, we are looking at a scenario in which the very organization tasked with investigating an officer-involved-shooting… are behind the donation drive to support the officer involved in the shooting

I just phrased that in the most neutral terms possible and it’s still absolutely damning

unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

being black is really wonderful and convenient bc i can just be sitting here in my room like this

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and whenever people come looking for me to do stuff i dont even really have to hide all i have to do it turn off my light and

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and then when they leave i just 

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ive received this question so many times since i posted this yesterday so imma just leave this right here ok  

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