Javier H. Castillo

donrickles:

And read this blog if you’re confused about some of the issues involved (i.e., racism).

Federal investigators are focused on one Ferguson, Mo., police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teenager, but at least five other police officers and one former officer in the town’s 53-member department have been named in civil rights lawsuits alleging the use of excessive force.

In four federal lawsuits, including one that is on appeal, and more than a half-dozen investigations over the past decade, colleagues of Darren Wilson’s have separately contested a variety of allegations, including killing a mentally ill man with a Taser, pistol-whipping a child, choking and hog-tying a child and beating a man who was later charged with destroying city property because his blood spilled on officers’ clothes.

One officer has faced three internal affairs probes and two lawsuits over claims he violated civil rights and used excessive force while working at a previous police department in the mid-2000s. That department demoted him after finding credible evidence to support one of the complaints, and he subsequently was hired by the Ferguson force.

Police officials from outside Ferguson and plaintiffs’ lawyers say the nature of such cases suggests there is a systemic problem within the Ferguson police force. Department of Justice officials said they are considering a broader probe into whether there is a pattern of using excessive force that routinely violates people’s civil rights.

Counting Wilson, whose shooting of Michael Brown on Aug. 9 set off a firestorm of protests and a national debate on race and policing, about 13 percent of Ferguson’s officers have faced ­excessive-force investigations. Comparable national data on excessive force probes is not available. But the National Police Misconduct Statistics and Reporting Project, funded by the libertarian Cato Institute, estimated on the basis of 2010 data that about 1 percent of U.S. police officers — 9.8 out of every 1,000 — will be cited for or charged with misconduct. Half of those cases involve excessive force.

latimes:

Six Missouri residents have filed a federal lawsuit alleging excessive force and false arrests by the Ferguson and St. Louis County police departments during the Ferguson protests following the shooting death of Michael Brown. The residents accuse the police of humiliating them and depriving them of their civil rights; their lawsuit seeks millions in damages for alleged abuses that took place between Aug. 11 and 13
Photo: People protest in Ferguson. Credit: Charlie Riedel / Associated Press

latimes:

Six Missouri residents have filed a federal lawsuit alleging excessive force and false arrests by the Ferguson and St. Louis County police departments during the Ferguson protests following the shooting death of Michael Brown. The residents accuse the police of humiliating them and depriving them of their civil rights; their lawsuit seeks millions in damages for alleged abuses that took place between Aug. 11 and 13

Photo: People protest in Ferguson. Credit: Charlie Riedel / Associated Press

dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:


biyuti:


girljanitor:


dumbthingswhitepplsay:


popca:


dolgematki:


nativevoice:


“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 
IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.
A case of ginger ale: $82.
Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.
Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120608/inuit-food-prices-protest-120608/#ixzz1xKWAJkGe


Holy hell.


WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.


ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross
64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.
Conservationists
have been starving
these people
to death for years.


Reblogging for the extra articles. 
Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 


Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.


This is really fucking important.
This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.
It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.
The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.
Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.
There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:

biyuti:

girljanitor:

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

popca:

dolgematki:

nativevoice:

“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 

IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.

A case of ginger ale: $82.

Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.

Holy hell.

WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.

ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross

64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.

Conservationists

have been starving

these people

to death for years.

Reblogging for the extra articles. 

Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 

Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.

This is really fucking important.

This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.

It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.

The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.

  • Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
  • If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
  • Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
  • Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
  • For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
  • Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
  • For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
  • Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.

There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

spoktrop:

watchtheskytonight:

This was just cool all by itself…but keep watching

I WAS NOT EXPECTING THAT

spoktrop:

watchtheskytonight:

This was just cool all by itself…but keep watching

I WAS NOT EXPECTING THAT

cultureunseen:

Hiroshima and Nagasaki…

elegantpaws:

lol

washmydamntowels:

we must have skipped this part in Crim Law when we talked about murder

thepoliticalfreakshow:

In a decision by the highest immigration court in the U.S., it was decided that female victims of severe domestic abuse in their home countries will be eligible to seek asylum in America.

The decision was made on Tuesday after the Board of Immigration Appeals ruled that Aminta Cifuentes, a battered wife from Guatemala, would be allowed to seek asylum in the United States. The battle had been ongoing since 2005, when Cifuentes fled Guatemala and her abusive husband in search of asylum in the U.S. Her husband had beat her, raped her, and thrown paint thinner at her. Officials in Guatemala had not responded to her pleas to arrest her husband, so she fled across the border.

The New York Times reports that the decision to allow Cifuentes asylum came after a longstanding position held by the government was changed by the Obama administration, claiming Cifuentes as a part of a persecuted group. Battered women didn’t factor under refugee law, as their cases were all perceived to be individual incidents.

Via the New York Times:

Since 1995, when federal officials first tried to set guidelines for the immigration courts on whether domestic abuse victims could be considered for asylum, the issue has been reviewed by four attorneys general, vigorously debated by advocates and repeatedly examined by the courts. With its published decision, unusual in the immigration courts, the appeals board set a clear precedent for judges.

Women’s rights advocates have been arguing for years that under the legal definition of “refugee,” domestic violence counts as a form of persecution. Residents of other countries can seek asylum in the U.S. if they have a “well-founded fear of persecution’ based on race, nationality, religion, political opinion or ‘membership in a particular social group,’” the New York Times reports.

Though the law currently will only apply to women from Guatemala, it is expected that women from any country who are victims of domestic abuse will now be treated as refugees from persecution and will be eligible to seek asylum. The likelihood of getting approved, however, is still slim.

According to the report in the Times, last year, immigration courts approved only 9,933 asylum cases throughout the country.

Source: Dayna Evans for Gawker